History

Our firm is the proud successor of one of the oldest law firms in the Edmonton area. Our origins date back to June 1895, when the Honourable Alexander Cameron Rutherford arrived from Ontario and established a law office at the railhead of the Calgary and Edmonton Railway, then known as South Edmonton, District of Alberta, Northwest Territories. Alexander Rutherford was the first lawyer on the south side of the river, an area later to become known as Strathcona.

We look back with great satisfaction to the results we have achieved for our clients in the past – clients with local, national and international interests. We are proud of our established tradition of dedication, performance, and community service. The present members of our firm are committed to carrying forward this tradition into “our second century of service”.

For you, our present and future clients, we believe we must be innovative and constructive. Our emphasis is on serving you by providing the highest quality service in a cost effective and timely fashion. The “old fashioned” values of professionalism and service are now combined with our modern technology and current legal knowledge to provide you with the effective representation you need.

Our firm has a proud past. Our firm is richly endowed with a tradition of service to clients and to the community. Our firm seeks to live by that tradition.


1895

Our founder, Alexander Cameron Rutherford establishes a law office in South Edmonton, District of Alberta, Northwest Territories, becoming South Edmonton’s only lawyer


1899

South Edmonton is incorporated as the Town of Strathcona and Alexander Rutherford becomes the first Secretary-Treasurer of Strathcona


1902

Alexander Rutherford becomes the Deputy Speaker of the Territorial Legislative Assembly


1905

Alberta becomes a Province and Alexander Rutherford becomes the first Premier of the Province of Alberta


1905

Our firm becomes a member of the Edmonton Board of Trade (which was renamed the Edmonton Chamber of Commerce in 1928)

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Jasper Ave. East Edmonton

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Jasper Ave. From 101 St Edmonton


1952

Louis Desrochers graduates from the Faculty of Law at the University of Alberta and articles with the firm


1952

Stanley McCuaig becomes President of the Law Society of Alberta


1970

Louis Desrochers is elected chancellor of the University of Alberta

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McCuaig Desrochers present location in TD Tower

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McCuaig Desrochers’ Office Front Entrance

 

2016

Thomas W. Achtymichuk, Partner, is appointed a Judge at the Provincial Court of Alberta.


Present

Now in its second century, McCuaig Desrochers LLP is proud to continue its long tradition of dedicated service to its clients and community

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The Honourable Alexander Cameron Rutherford

1911

Alexander Rutherford’s law practice opens an office on the north side of the North Saskatchewan River, and he is later joined in practice by his son-in-law Stanley McCuaig


1925

The firm changes its name to Rutherford, Rutherford and McCuaig


1944

Stanley McCuaig becomes the President of the Alberta branch of the Canadian Bar Association


1948

Stanley McCuaig becomes the National President of the Canadian Bar Association


1948

Eric McCuaig articles with the firm, joining his father in the practice of law

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University of Alberta


1971

The firm changes its name to McCuaig Desrochers


1972

Eric McCuaig becomes President of the Law Society of Alberta


1974

David C. McDonald, Partner, is appointed to the Court of Queen’s Bench of Alberta and is later elevated to the Alberta Court of Appeal


1993

Sidney Wood, Partner, is appointed to the Alberta Provincial Court


1995

McCuaig Desrochers moves its offices to its present location in TD Tower


2001

Frans Slatter, Partner, is appointed to the Court of Queen’s Bench and is later elevated to the Alberta Court of Appeal


2002

Tom Achtymichuk, Partner, becomes President of the Canadian Bar Association’s Alberta Branch


2005

John Gill, Partner, is appointed to Court of Queen’s Bench

Image courtesy of Peel’s Prairie Provinces, a digital initiative of the University of Alberta Libraries.